Posted in submission call

Submission Call: Screen Door Review – Literary Voices of the Queer South

Screen Door Review is a quarterly literary magazine that publishes all types of poetry, short stories, flash fiction, and comics authored by individuals belonging to the southern queer (lgbtq) community of the United States. We’re currently reading for our second issue. Our first issue can be read here.

sdr_firstissueThe purpose of the magazine is to provide a platform of expression to those whose identities—at least in part—derive from the complicated relationship between queer person and place. Specifically, queer person and the South. Through publication, we aim to not only express, but also validate and give value to these voices, which are oftentimes overlooked, undermined, condemned, or silenced.

The topics of your work do not have to be queer or southern in theme, but we do ask that you as a contributor belong to the queer community and also identify as southern (AL, AR, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, SC, TN, TX, VA, WV). Since we are very much trying to authentically represent lgbtq southern voices, please indicate in the cover letter where you’re from and state that you do, in fact, belong to the queer community. That way we know that you’ve read these guidelines and that you understand and support our mission. If you feel that your queerness or southernness needs explaining, please include that in the cover letter, as well. 

Also, if you would rather be published anonymously, please specify and we will be happy to keep your name private.

We accept and encourage simultaneous submissions. If your work is accepted by another publication, please let us know by leaving a note in your submission. No need to withdraw the entire submission.

Please submit only one entry for each category per reading period. Once we have an issue out, then that’s when you can apply again.

All authors retain all rights to their work throughout the publishing process. However, if your work is subsequently published elsewhere, please mention that it was first published with us at Screen Door Review. With that said, we are open to previously published work as long as you own the rights. 

We will not accept anything that promotes violence or ill-will directed toward any individual or group of people. If your work requires a trigger warning, please include it at the top of the document. 

Comics and Graphic Narratives: Please submit up to 8 pages of work. This can include multiple short comics or one longer piece.

Poetry: Please submit 3-5 poems in one document with each poem starting on a new page. No more than ten pages altogether. Single spaced.

Short Stories: Please submit one short story up to 10,000 words in length. Single spaced.

Flash Fiction: Please submit 1-3 flash fiction narratives no longer than 1000 words each in a single document. Each piece should start on a new page. Single spaced.

We welcome your submissions for issue 2, due out in June! For more information or if you’re ready to submit, click here to find our Submittable.

We look forward to reading your work!

 

 

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Posted in submission call

Submission Calls – cahoodaloodaling

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cahoodaloodaling is a collaborative publication. Our quarterly issues are shaped by an eclectic staff and a revolving guest editor. We also have varying calls for submissions, based on either a theme or a style, and we love to see how our collaborators interpret them. As such, our issues are ever-changing and our style ever-evolving. Feel free to send us cross-media work, push the envelope, or even suggest an idea for a future issue or feature. We especially love collaborative work, but it is not a requirement for submissions. We are what you make us.

Current calls include:

Issue #24 – Solitude’s Spectrum

“The world breaks everyone, and afterward, some are strong at the broken places.” —Hemingway

Solitude—whether alone on the road in a car, train, motel room, or a forest trail, or even secluded and tucked away in your home, whether it’s a welcomed moment of peacefulness or a lonely state of despair—times of solitude shape us, recharge us, and break us down to our essence. Sometimes we choose to step away from the world. Sometimes the world breaks us and casts us aside. In those moments alone, if we make the choice to continue and create, true artists are born. We cross a border we cannot uncross and heal through our words, finding ourselves—and sometimes finding new selves in the process. As Hemingway said, sometimes we’re strong in those broken places, and sometimes we’re not. Sometimes that jagged broken part affects us forever afterward.

This fall issue we are interested in capturing both the positive, reaffirming pieces about solitude along with those that reveal pain, heartbreak, and introspection. We seek to investigate those breaking point moments, those halting discoveries, those empowered decisions that compel us to walk away from the world and to let the silt settle in the pool of water in our soul. Whether you enjoy locking yourself away or you had to in order to save yourself from hell, we want to hear how these moments lead to creative revelations and re-energized focus, or how they still haunt you to this day.

Guest Editor: James H. Duncan of Hobo Camp Review
Submissions due 9/9/17
Issue live 10/31/17

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Issue #25 – Queer Spaces

The queer identity is multitudinous and multifaceted. Despite the strong sense of unity we share, wherever it is that we go, being queer in one place is going to be different than being queer in another—often times, vastly so. As such, the individual delivers to the world an identity that is comprised simultaneously of sexual and geographic orientation. We as a community embody what it means to be African and transsexual, Alabamian and bisexual, Russian and lesbian, Californian and asexual, Iranian and gay.

Whichever letter of the queer alphabet you ascribe to, that identity is worth expressing in a manner that does not separate you from the culture that you belong to, but rather reveals the complicated relationship between exterior and interior place. The world needs to know us as we really are, not as we are stereotypically perceived to be. In this issue, we invite works that deliver a sense of the relationship that exists between queer person and place.

The topics of your work do not have to be queer in theme, but we do ask that you as a contributor belong to the queer community. Also, if you would rather be published anonymously, please specify and we will be happy to keep your name private.

Guest Editor: Alesha Dawson, editor-in-chief of the upcoming
Screen Door Review

Submissions due 12/9/17
Issue live 1/31/18

Posted in Book Release, fiction, poetry, published, Uncategorized

America Is Not the World – Release!

America Is Not the World – an international collection of poetry and short fiction from Pankhearst is now available via Amazon. You can purchase the collection here.

Other writers and editors have praised this anthology:

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SHINJINI BHATTACHARJEE, poet and Editor of Hermeneutic Chaos and Press:

The landscape of America Is Not the World enacts important historical and cultural intersections through a vivid mélange of symbolic and imagistic riches that are unsparingly true. The collection reconstructs our perception of America through poems and stories that fold maps and question binaries by narrating the lives of our complex, often troubled worlds that do not harbor easy answers. But, at the same time, it also offers the splendid possibility of a human culture that dissolves the glistening weight of its wounds together. This is an anthology that hums and crackles with a formidable urgency that is rare, intimate, poignant and necessary, assembling languages that our identities won’t reveal. Prepare to emerge from it transformed.


SADE ANDRIA ZABALA, columnist for Art-Parasites and author of WAR SONGS and Coffee and Cigarettes:

“Nothing feels like loss anymore,” says a powerful Pakistani poem by one of the many international writers in America Is Not The World. This book is raw, diverse, and impassioned, and comes at a time when the entire world needs it, even when many prefer to remain deaf to the truth. Pankhearst’s new collection is not another scream into the void – it is a wake-up call. Everyone ought to hear the alarm.


DONNA-MARIE RILEY, author of Love and Other Small Wars:

These are the voices we need – voices that break the monotony. This collection is wonderful and heart-wrenching in equal measure. Wonderful because these voices are so incredibly articulate and individual and necessary. Heart-wrenching because I am so sorry for the things they have to say. I am amazed and humbled by the tenderness of these poems. They throb while you’re reading them and echo long after you’ve finished. A collection that sings.

I’m so pleased to share this anthology with everyone. It’s been months and months of work and an endeavor that has humbled me both as a poet and an editor. The contributors of this anthology have shared brave and poignant work that deserves to be read.

This book will stir your empathy.

Please support this project:

Buy it. Loan it out. Give it away.
Talk about it. Review it. Share the news.